9" Workshop Information

 

The first Workshop series was the 1934 No 5. (405 with bench drive)

No. 5 Notes:

* Has an oil hole in the half nut lever, later model Workshops had the hole above the lever in the apron casting.

* Has a noticeably thinner saddle.

* The saddle lock is on the right rear wing and locked the saddle gib.

* Has a thicker compound base with short "duck bill" casting at the rear. Allowed chips and swarf to collect around the cross feed screw.

* Has a shorter compound swivel.

* The compound rest top and base had 5 #10 screws for the gibs.

* The gib screws are 10-32

* The compound base has a single swivel boss locking screw on the right side.

* The compound base has a tendency to vibrate when threading.

* The compound feed screw mount bushing is a smaller hex nut style.

* Has smaller micrometer dials.

* The cross feed mount bushing is shorter that the later workshops.

* The cross-feed nut was cast-iron and a little longer (0.960) than later Workshops, with a smaller diameter (0.625) mounting boss.

* The headstock is a top oiling style.

* The spindle threads are 1-3/8-10 and the spindle length (11-13/16) is shorter than the later Workshops, has 3/4 through hole.

* The Change Gears were 20 DP.

* The compound gear is 20/100 or 5:1

* The No. 5 did not have a reverse shifter like the later Workshops; it used a removable 32 tooth reverse gear in the train.

* The Gear Change table is totally different.

* The lead screw, at the point where the gear fitted to its end, had a diameter of 0.625.

* The lead screws on the No 5ís were Acme left-hand instead of right-hand pitch.

* The tailstock has an open web allowing access from either side.

* The special studs that hold the half nuts on a 405 and on the prototype 415 are longer. These original studs or special bolts are about 1/4 inch longer than standard workshop models.

* The apron casting is just a little thicker in the half nut area on a 405 lathe.

* A plain, non-adjustable bench-mounted countershaft for the HMD 405 models was used for the bench drives.

* The No 5 Workshop does not use the capillary spring loaded oilier, it has a felt wick in the keyway at the top of the bearing journal under the oil cup.

 

The next improved version, was introduced in 1935 as the No 15 Workshop (415 with bench drive).

No.15 Notes:

* Has a longer apron and wider saddle.

* Has and oil hole above the half nut lever not in the lever.

* Has the saddle lock on the left front saddle wing.

* Has the hole for the Tommy bar in the cross feed mount bushing.

* Has larger micrometer dials.

* The compound has two swivel boss locking screws.

* The change gears are 18 DP

* The compound gear is 18/72 or 4:1.

* Has higher tooth count turning gears for finer feed rates.

* The compound rest top and base have 4 #12 screws for the gibs.

* The gib screws are 12-28

* Has an adjustable bench-mounted countershaft for the HMD 415

* The tailstock has a closed web.

* The lead screws on the No 15ís were Acme 3/4-8 right-hand pitch.

* The spindle threads are 1-1/2-8 and the spindle length is longer (12-1/4) with 3/4 through hole.

* The lead screw, at the point where the gear fitted to its end, had a diameter of 0.5625.

 

The Workshop Model A, B, and C designation started in late 1938 with the Model C being first.

 

In late 1938 South Bend first released the "New improved capillary oiling System" on the No. 15 Workshop, catalogs dated Jan 1939 show the improved versions.

A September 1938 catalog still lists the top oiling headstock.

The catalog no 415-YA (4 is for adjustable bench lathe drive) is a 3 foot bed, 6 speed, 40 to 630 rpm.

Most basic 415's at this time still had a soft spindle for the lower speed lathes. A heat-treated hardened and ground spindle was available as an option on the 415 and as standard on the 12-speed drive, the V-belt drive, and the Underneath drive lathes. This was still not the "Super finished spindle" released later.

 

Note that the C model has front side oil ports in the headstock and the earlier workshops were top-oilers.

Later year C models also had the new hardened and micro polished spindle.

 

In the 1939 and newer Workshop 9 inch lathes the three models are A, B, and C and are as follows:

 

The Model A has:

 

Quick Change Gear Box,

Power Cross Feed,

Friction Clutch and Half Nuts Apron.

 

The Model B has:

 

Separate Change Gears,

Power Cross Feed,

Friction Clutch and Half Nuts Apron.

 

The Model C has:

 

Separate Change Gears,

Half Nuts Apron.

 

The Model A is the most desirable and usually brings the higher prices.

 

9" South Bends also came as a Tool room model. This was the Model A with the following additions:

 

Precision lead screw

Hand wheel collet closer

Collet rack

Taper attachment

Thread dial

Thread stop

Micrometer carriage stop

Large faceplate.

 

Catalog numbers with post 1947 serial number code stamp:

Catalog No.

Description

Code

15-B

9" Model C, Countershaft drive bench lathe, DFCS, less bench

NCR

315

9" Model C, UMD with metal column base

NYR

415

9" Model C, 6-Speed, HMD bench lathe

NCR

515

9" Model C, 8-Speed, HMD V-belt bench lathe

NCR

615

9" Model C, 12-Speed, HMD bench lathe

NCR

715

9" Model C, 16-Speed, HMD V-belt bench lathe

NCR

 

 

 

44-B

9" Model A, Countershaft drive bench lathe, DFCS, less bench

NAR

344

9" Model A, UMD with metal column base

NAR

444

9" Model A, 6-Speed, HMD bench lathe

NAR

544

9" Model A, 8-Speed, HMD V-belt bench lathe

NAR

644

9" Model A, 12-Speed, HMD bench lathe

NAR

744

9" Model A, 16-Speed, HMD V-belt bench lathe

NAR

 

 

 

77-B

9" Model B, Countershaft drive bench lathe, DFCS, less bench

NBR

377

9" Model B, UMD with metal column base

NPR

477

9" Model B, 6-Speed, HMD bench lathe

NBR

577

9" Model B, 8-Speed, HMD V-belt bench lathe

NBR

677

9" Model B, 12-Speed, HMD bench lathe

NBR

777

9" Model B, 16-Speed, HMD V-belt bench lathe

NBR

 

 

 

Most of the parts, for/on, a particular series lathe (like the 9 inch horizontal drive) are the same between the models A, B and C. Just the parts pertaining to the Gear Box, Apron and Cross Feed are different. For example, The Model A Gear Box and Lead Screw are unique to that model. The Friction Clutch Apron is the same on models A and B and so is the Cross Feed Screw, but the Lead Screw on the Model B is unique. The Change Gears are the same between models B and C but their Aprons, Cross Feed and Lead Screws are not.

 

As to accessories for your lathe, they are the same for all models within a particular series. When looking for parts or accessories for your lathe, check the unit code. All sub-assemblies and most accessories will have a unit code stamped on them. For example, your compound will have a unit code stamped in the T-slot under the tool post. It will look something like "C 100 N." Your apron will have a unit code something like "A 100 N" or "A 101 NK" on the front.

 

The unit code is made up of three parts: The prefix letter or letters identify the subassembly (C - Compound, A - Apron, etc.). The body number of the code identifies the version of the subassembly. The first number is the major design version and the last two numbers are minor version changes. (e.g. 100 - first design, 101 - first design, first version change, etc.). The suffix letter or letters identify what lathe series the subassembly will fit. This is the most important information to remember! The suffixes are as follows:

 

N - 9 Inch,

K - 10 K,

R - Heavy Ten,

L - Heavy Ten (Large Spindle),

T - Thirteen Inch,

F - 14.5 Inch,

H - 16 Inch.

 

Now, some subassemblies and accessories are used on more than one series lathe. The 9 inch and the 10K lathes share many of the same parts and assemblies. Therefore, the apron (on later models made after the introduction of the 10K) will be marked with a two letter suffix code (i.e. "A 101 NK"). These suffix codes are used in part numbers also (except "general hardware" parts) . For example, the cover plate used on the micrometer carriage stop is part number: PT1209NT1. This breaks down to: "PT" - Part (Assemblies start "AS"), "1209" - The Number, "NT" - Fits lathes 9 inch Through 13 inch, "1" - First version. Sometimes, you can see similar numbers cast into some parts as well. These suffix codes are very useful when checking used parts for compatibility with you lathe.